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Engineering a 1934 Pro Street Street Rod

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Click for YouTube Video Overview of Car

Building A Transmission Tunnel

The Problem

The floor of the car is made from heavy fiberglass.  However to install a Lokar Shifter and Emergency Brake quite a bit of the transmission tunnel must be removed.  This is a view of what is left to be covered.  Could have made a pattern and  a fiberglass cover but  3/32 inch aluminum was  easier to  fit to the contour.  However,  bending 3/32 inch aluminum to this  tapered shape is not an easy task.

Making a Die

The solution was to build a die that fit the firewall side of the tunnel cover then put the aluminum into the die and one side would be properly contoured and the other would remain flat.  This is just the shape needed. A 2 X 6 made an ideal die.  It was shaped to the contour of the tunnel just above where it needed to be attached to cover the opening.  A little grease was all that would be needed to have it slide.

Where is the Press?

Getting a 1500 pound press was the next step. A creative idea was to use 1/2 of a Sonoma Pick-up!  Note the two jacks.  One on either side of the die.   A 2 x 6 was added to the male die and placed under the truck frame. Just lower each very slowly. 

 Warning do not do this without thinking it all through, being very careful and proceeding slowly!! This can be dangerous!!  Neither GM nor I are responsible if you get hurt!

It Worked!

If you do it correctly this is what occurs!  The aluminum is contoured to the die on one side and just slightly curved on the other end.  Some hammering is needed for the bolt pads and  around the emergency brake.  Extra aluminum stock was used on the emergency brake side to raise the floor as close to the opening as possible. 

 Finished Part

This photo shows the finished part  sitting next to the hole in the transmission tunnel  It was fastened to the fiberglass with several small bolts and nuts.  The openings on top and other contours were adjusted with a body hammer to assure enough clearance around all of the linkage.

Finished Tunnel

The finished tunnel looks smooth and uniform.  A  new product was used as a filler to cover all the gaps.  It was only on the retail market for short while; a water based silicon.  It came in a tube and was much easier to make smooth than standard silicon sealant.  It adhered very well.  It did take a long time to fully cure.  It was still flexible at that point.  It all gets covered with padding and carpet.  However "I" know it looks good and when building a Street Rod for yourself, that is the most important thing!

 

Free Information on Welding Race Cars & Street Rods

Have a Welder?   Improve Weld Starts and Have Shielding Gas Cylinder Last at Least Twice as Long! 

Note: Our Patented GSS is Not Available in "Stores"

A home shop fabricator in Georgia with a Miller TM 175 amp welder purchased a 50 foot Gas Saver System ( GSSTM ) so he could use a larger cylinder and mount it on the wall of his shop.  He wrote:

"The system works great.  Thanks for the professional service and a great product."   Click To See His Home Shop

 

A Professional Street Rod Builder Had This to Say:

With their standard MIG welder gas delivery hose the peak shielding flow at weld start was measured at 150 CFH. That caused air to be sucked into the gas stream causing poor weld starts.  With the GSS replacing their existing hose, the peak flow surge at the weld start was about 50 CFH.  Total gas use was cut in half.

Kyle Bond, President, quickly saw the improvement achieved in weld start quality as a significant advantage!   Kyle, an excellent automotive painter, was well aware of the effects of gas surge caused by pressure buildup in the delivery hose when stopped.  He has to deal with the visible effects in the air hose lines on the spray gun in his paint booth!  The paint surge is visible and creates defects unless the gun is triggered off the part being painted!  We can’t do that with our MIG gun!

 

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Wiring
 Adding 250 HP Nitrous to a ZZ 502 Big Block
MIG Gas Saver System $aves money !
3 Inch Stainless Exhaust System 
"Building the Body"  
"Construction Details Index"    
"Building Dash Extension"
"Brakes"
"Building Stereo Wall"  
"WARNING: "Weld Safely"
"Fabricating the Interior"
"Other Fabricated Parts"
"Other Features"
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